Every American who uses a mobile phone is being tracked on a daily basis by their own government. It’s being done routinely, and the NSA is building a massive data center in Utah in order to be able to analyze, in real time, the actual voice content of all phone calls.

Those phone calls are already being recorded and archived, by the way. That’s been 
admitted by the FBI. But in the near future, the government will be able to analyze every phone call happening in real time, then flag “suspicious” conversations for possible action against the offending phone users.

This is your America, folks: A runaway criminal police state where the routine government spying on your private conversations is openly admitted and even justified by the President.

The U.S. government is a criminal operation. Just in the last few months, we’ve learned that the Department of Justice secretly taps the phones of reporters and journalists. The IRS secretly intimidates and terrorizes selected groups based on their political speech. And now we learn the NSA has been routinely spying on us all through a super-secret surveillance program that means none of our electronic communications are private from the government.

At what point do you realize just how onerous, dangerous and out of control this has all become?


Now, granted, the technological capabilities of the NSA are massive. And, as was revealed in subsequent news reports following the initial revelations about the NSA, tech companies and Internet Service Providers are in cahoots with the government, so they’re not going to protect you. Further, the Fourth Amendment appears to mean nothing to the Obama Administration.

What’s a poor, hapless citizen to do? First off, take a deep breath and read on. There are things you can do.

‘Pretty Good Privacy’

Per Slate:

Not every communication can be tracked and eavesdropped on by the government, however, and there are ways to reduce the chances of being snooped on. First, instead of browsing the Internet in a way that reveals your IP address, you can mask your identity by using an anonymizing tool like Tor (https://www.torproject.org) or by connecting to the Web using a Virtual Private Network (https://www.torproject.org). Additionally, you can avoid Google search by using an alternative like Ixquick (https://ixquick.com/eng/), which has solid privacy credentials and says it does not log any IP addresses or search terms or share information with third parties.

Want to send protected email? You can do that as well. If you happen to be using a commercial email provider like Google, Yahoo! or another service identified as having been co-opted by PRISM, the NSA’s snoop program, you can certainly slow down the agency by sending and receiving emails encrypted with PGP (Pretty Good Privacy), which has been around for years, or a free alternative, GPG (http://www.gnupg.org/). Both of these products can be used to encrypt and decrypt email messages – unless, however, you have Trojan spyware installed on your machine.

“Novice computer users learning how to use PGP or GPG may find it a daunting prospect at first, but there are plenty of tutorials online for both Mac and Windows users that can help guide you through the process.”

 

Organizations or firms could go even further and stop using a third-party service and instead set up their own email server, “helping ensure no secret court orders can be filed to gain covert access to confidential files,” Slate reports. Private documents can be stored online, if necessary, and kept shielded usingCloudfogger (http://www.cloudfogger.com/en/) in conjunction with Dropbox.

Instant messaging and phone or video chats can be better protected if you avoid using Microsoft and Google-based services such as Skype and Gchat and instead adopt more secure forms of communication. Those include Jitsi (
https://jitsi.org/
), which can be utilized for peer-to-peer calls video calls that are encrypted.



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