List of words to avoid using if you don’t want the NSA to flag your emails, phone calls

 

More than a year ago, following a Freedom of Information Act request, the federal government, via the Department of Homeland Security, was forced to release a list of trigger terms that causes any number of federal agencies to put you under extra scrutiny. Per Britain’s Daily Mail, May 26, 2012:

The Department of Homeland Security has been forced to release a list of keywords and phrases it uses to monitor social networking sites and online media for signs of terrorist or other threats against the U.S.

The intriguing the list includes obvious choices such as ‘attack’, ‘Al Qaeda’, ‘terrorism’ and ‘dirty bomb’ alongside dozens of seemingly innocent words like ‘pork’, ‘cloud’, ‘team’ and ‘Mexico’.

List of words ‘broad, ambiguous’

The list helps shed a little needed light on how government analysts like NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden are instructed on how to troll the Internet in search of threats, both foreign and domestic.

According to the Mail the words are contained in DHS’ 2011 “Analyst’s Desktop Binder,” which is used by employees at the department’s National Operations Center. There, workers are instructed to identify “media reports that reflect adversely on 
DHS and response activities,” the binder notes (you know, like this story, most likely).

Department heads had to release the binder in the wake of a House hearing regarding documents that have been obtained per a FOIA lawsuit, “which revealed how analysts monitor social networks and media organizations for comments that ‘reflect adversely’ on the government,” the paper reported.

Naturally DHS feigned innocence, insisting that the practice of targeting keywords within electronic communications is not policing the Web, per se, but rather only as a means of learning about potential threats.

Besides terrorism, analysts are instructed to look for any indicators of natural disasters in the making, threats to public health and serious major crimes, like mass shootings, major drug arrests and busts of illegal immigrants.


Rick Perry and the state of Texas has had a major impact on Obama’s net gains in job growth to the tune of 43% according to JP Updates, and the funny thing is Texas only accounts for less than 10% of the total US population:

From the start of February 2009 (Obama’s first full month in office) through the end of May 2013 (the last month there is available Federal data for jobs per state) the United States had a net gain of 2,076,000 jobs. In the same time, Texas had a net gain of 882,582 jobs. In other words, 43% of the net job gains since Obama’s first full month in office are from Texas. This is a major success for Perry considering that his State has less than 7% of the overall U.S. population.

Those jobs numbers are from the Federal Bureau of Labor Statistics so there is no room for the Left to argue that the Texas numbers are no good.


Mysterious death during gun control debate raises questions

What you are about to read is astonishing. I’m not even sure what’s the right conclusion to draw from it. But here’s what we know so far:

John Noveske is one of the most celebrated battle rifle manufacturers in America. His rifles, found atwww.NoveskeRifleworks.com are widely recognized as some of the finest pieces of American-made hardware ever created. (I own one of his rifles, and it’s a masterpiece of a machine that just keeps on running.) Sadly, John Noveske was killed in a mysterious car crash just a few days ago, on January 4, 2013.

According to the Outdoor Wire, his car “traveled across the oncoming lane onto the dirt highway shoulder until it struck two large boulders. The vehicle rolled and Mr. Noveske was ejected.”
But barely a week before this incident, John Noveske posted a lengthy, detailed post on Facebook that listed all the school shootings tied to psychiatric drugs.

At the end of the post, he asked, “What drugs was Adam Peter Lanza on?”

That was the last post he ever made.

John Noveske wasn’t the first prominent gun rights supporter to be killed in the last few days. Keith Ratliff, the creator of a super-popular YouTube channel featuring videos of exotic weapons, was also recently found dead.
The
Daily Mail reports that Ratliff was “discovered on a rural road in Carnesville, Georgia.

Ratliff had a single gunshot wound the head and police are treating his death as a homicide.”

Someone murdered Ratliff, in other words, and it had to be someone with the ability to get close enough to Ratliff to take him out without warning.
Beyond these two shootings, the widely-discredited CNN journalist Piers Morgan, wanted for questioning in Britain’s
Daily Mirror phone hacking scandal, invited guests onto his show who threatened Alex Jones’ children and laughed about the idea of Piers Morgan shooting Alex Jones with an AR-15.


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